Roman occupation of South-western Scotland
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Roman occupation of South-western Scotland being reports of excavations and surveys carried out under the auspices of the Society by Glasgow Archaeological Society.

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Published by Maclehose in Glasgow .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Scotland -- Antiquities

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby John Clarke ... [et al.] ; edited with an historical survey by S.N. Miller.
SeriesGlasgow University publications -- no. 83
ContributionsMiller, Steuart Napier.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18825648M

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Get this from a library! The Roman Occupation of South-Western Scotland. Being reports of excavations and surveys carried out under the auspices of the Glasgow Archæological Society. By John Clarke, J.M. Davidson [and others] Edited for the Society with an historical survey by S.N. Miller.. [John CLARKE, Archaeologist.; S N Miller; Glasgow Archaeological Society.].   Addeddate Identifier Identifier-ark ark://t0sr4b Ocr ABBYY FineReader Ppi Scanner Internet Archive Python library Auchendavy was a Roman fort on the Antonine Wall in Scotland. Much of the site archeology was destroyed by the builders of the Forth and Clyde Canal. Between Bar Hill and Balmuildy the wall roughly follows the southern bank of the River Kelvin. The site of the fort is north of Kirkintilloch's northern border. It can be seen as a mound mid-way between the Forth and Clyde Canal and the y: United Kingdom. Inveravon is sited on the east side of the River Avon in Scotland. It was long considered to be the likely site for a Roman Fort on the Antonine Wall in fort is one of the most dubious on the wall although some excavation and geophysics has been done. Near Inveravon Tower, the bare traces of a fort were found but there is nothing that an unskilled visitor could identify.

Get this from a library! The Roman occupation of south-western Scotland, being reports of excavations and surveys carried out under the auspices of the Glasgow Archaeological Society,. [Steuart Napier Miller; John Clarke; Glasgow Archaeological Society.]. Book reviews, a distinctive feature of the journal since its establishment (as the Glasgow Archaeological Journal) in , provide a critical perspective on Scottish archaeology and a well-established forum for scholarly debate. In addition to books, recent volumes of the journal have reviewed new museums, exhibitions and research on Scotland. The Roman occupation of South-Western Scotland. Being reports of excavations and surveys carried out under the auspices of the Glasgow Archaeological Society Glasgow: Robert Maclehose & Co, – Cleddans Roman fortlet was located by trial trenching in south of the main road between Duntocher and Bearsden. Hutcheson Hill being halfway between the known Roman forts of Duntocher to the west and Castlehill to the east and having a line of sight between them it was surmised that it may hold the site of an intermediate fort. This fortlet's discovery at Cleddans seemed to strengthen the.

The Roman occupation of South-western Scotland: being reports of excavations and surveys carried out under the auspices of the Glasgow Archaeological Society. Maclehose. Maclehose. [62]. Croy Hill was a Roman fort, fortlet, and probable temporary camp on the Antonine Wall, near Croy, to the north east of the village in Scotland. Two communication platforms known as ‘expansions’ can be seen to the west of the fortlet. Alexander Park excavated the site in Sir George Macdonald wrote about his excavation of the site which occurred in , , and J G Scott, The Roman Occupation of South West Scotland from the Recall of Agricola to the Withdrawal under Trajan, GAJ, Vol.4, 2. Allan Wilson, Roman Penetration in Strathclyde South of the Antonine Wall -Part 1 - The Topographical Evidence, GAJ, Vol, , pps   Bibliographical Links See: The Geography of Claudius Ptolemaeus, trans. by E.L. Stevenson (Dover, New York, ); Principal sites in Roman occupation of Britain, with indication of the local Celtic tribes. Tribes of Wales at the time of the Roman invasion. Exact boundaries are : 41K.